Trump Pushes To Repeal DACA

Christopher Jones artwork
Christopher Jones artwork

The fate of more than 700,000 immigrants people could be upended by President Donald Trump push to repeal the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.

The program, known as DACA for short, was created in 2012 by the Obama administration. It allowed young people brought to this country illegally by their parents to get a temporary reprieve from deportation and to receive permission to work, study and obtain driver's licenses. 

B-CU Student Twitter Poll
B-CU Student Twitter Poll

The Trump administration wants tougher immigration and border security measures, crackdowns on sanctuary cities, green card restrictions and money for a border wall. His plans have many immigrants worried on what will become of them. Some including college students right here Bethune-Cookman University that has family or friends that are subject to DACA. 

One student here whose family will be directly affected by the program spoke to the Voice on the condition that she would not be identified. She is among many international students here at B-CU, who collectively represent 37 countries. 

The student said that she has an 27-year-old aunt who is a serious risk of being deported. The proposed repeal of DACA has taken an emotional toll on her, according to the student. Not only has her aunt cared for her since she was a child, the girl said the same aunt has been funding her college career.

B-CU Student Twitter Poll
B-CU Student Twitter Poll

Her aunt, she said, came to the U.S. in 1990, around the ages of 15 or 16, from Haiti. Because she was unable to enroll in public school, the aunt started working as a CNA and has worked in home care. 

When asked the reason why her aunt decided to come to the United States, she said, "To avoid war after her brother was killed." The student said her aunt would be going to Canada in the next six to eight months.

A Twitter poll of students here at B-CU found that while most-62 percent-- were aware of DACA. Likewise, 70 percent said they did not know anyone affected. Meanwhile, everyone felt the president was wrong to try to rescind the program.

By Stephanie Owens and Ashlyn Denson